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Archive for the ‘LYS’ Category

When I completed this square I was so very pleased.  It LTK sq 11had been quite a challenge, but I managed to deal with all those stitches slipped with yarn in back and with yarn in front.  I bound it off and proudly held it up for my husband to admire.  He’s a muggle, but he’s polite one–he immediately offered up a very specific compliment.  "I like how those two in the middle look like they’re holding hands.".  ACK!  I looked at the square again.  Sure enough, there in the middle of the square, is indeed, a pair of motifs "holding hands" because I slipped a stitch with the yarn on the front rather than the back side of the work.  I could not make myself rip it out.  I simply could not.  So when I was next at the LYS it was still in my basket folded up with another recently finished square.  The ladies had a look and declared it a very charming mistake.  Upon hearing the tale of my husband’s reaction to the square they insisted that I should let it lie and count it among the lovelier squares of the ‘ghan.  So I am learning yet another lesson thanks  to Barbara Walker, my family, and friends-in-yarn.  A mistake can be more charming than perfection.  Some errors should simply be let go. 

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Yarn Sale!

My beloved LYS, Yes Yarn, had a yarn sale (40% off) this weekend so I indulged in some guilt free shopping. Yay! As you can see, there’s quite a bit of cream, lavender, and violet Encore in the pile. That should be enough to finish up the LTK ‘ghan. There’s a ball of black Encore too. The Man-child has asked me to knit a hat from the Hat Attack pattern for him in his favorite fashion color and he choose Encore since it’ll put up with being tossed into the washer. The two skeins of rosy mauve are a blanket for Ella in the planning stages. At the top of the photo are some lovely sock yarns. I intend to become proficient at sock knitting this year so I had to prepare my stash didn’t I? I’m now in possession of enough yarn for at least half a dozen pairs of socks. Yes, most of them are purple or include purple in their colorways. Why do you ask? ~g~
Three of these balls of yarn aren’t actually mine. At the center of the yarn orgy, right next to the purple Trekking, you can see two balls of red 127 Print. The Man-child intends to knit himself a scarf from those lovely balls of yarn. His third ball (doesn’t quite sound right does it?) is the textured, variegated grey Blissful on the right hand side just above the cream Encore. He says it’s to be an “elephant or something”. When he says something it really could be something. He’s created some interesting things with yarn & hook lately.

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Today we had our final sock class at Yes Yarn and encountered kitchener stitch. After much angst and discussion the class members have managed to make some lovely socks. Including B.’s lovely sock of self striping yarn that “by luck”, or so she claims *g* matches it’s mate perfectly. Last week E. told us about Silver’s Sock class. It’s an amazing online set of sock classes. I mentioned the site to B. while at the shop, but couldn’t remember the exact link so I promised her that I’d post the link here for her to find. Here it is. If you click on the tutorial for the sock knitted on DPNs and scroll down to the bottom you’ll see a link for “grafting the toe”. Click there and you’ll be taken to some excellent instructions for kitchener stitch with marvelous photos.

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Crocheted dishcloths

Recently I had the pleasure of teaching a crochet class at my beloved LYS, Yes Yarn. After deciding that one of our options for a first project would be a dishcloth I set about finding just the right pattern. I wanted to teach how to create foundation chains, turning chains, single crochet, and double crochet. I also wanted an something a little more challenging for those who might already have a little crochet experience. In addition, I hoped to find something readily available and easily accessed by the entire class. The most obvious option was to write my own pattern.

I’ve improvised and crocheted along doing my thing making stuff before, but I’ve never written down what I’ve done for someone else to follow before. I did sit down and crochet from the patterns row by row. Even found mistakes and corrected them. I hope if you find any errors you’ll forgive me for frustrating your craft, and let me know so that I can make corrections.

If you’re an experienced crocheter you may notice that my single crochet turning chains are a little unorthodox. Most instructions state that one should chain one then crochet into the same stitch from which the chain emerges. After much experimentation and comparison, I prefer the effect of a turning chain of two stitches and skipping the first stitch. Row one also calls for the first stitch to be made into the 4th chain from the hook rather than the usual third chain. This helps keep the corner from pulling up or curling later. Your own mileage, of course, may vary.

This first pattern is for a simple cloth. Alternating rows of single crochet and double crochet with an optional single crochet edging.

Basic dishcloth

For an approximately 9 in. square dishcloth you will need:

1 1/2 oz cotton yarn

small amount of contrasting color cotton yarn (optional)

H hook (or appropriate hook for both you and your chosen yarn)

Abbreviations used:

Ch–chain

SC—single crochet

DC—double crochet

Loosely chain 28

Row 1: Single crochet in 4th chain from hook. (do not count loop on hook). SC across to end.

Row 2: Chain 3. Turn. DC in second stitch (not the stitch your chain 3 emerges from but the next one). DC across to end.

Row 3: Chain 2. Turn. SC in second stitch and in each stitch across to end.

Row 4: Chain 3. Turn. DC in second stitch and in each stitch across to end.

Repeat rows 3 and 4 until cloth is about 9 in square or desired length. Ending on row 3.

Snip off yarn and pull through the last loop. Weave in ends.
Edge with single crochet in contrasting color if desired.

This is a photo of a slightly more challenging version of the basic dishcloth pattern above. It hasn’t been washed or blocked yet so the turning chains on the double crochet rows are quite obvious along the right hand edge. After washing/blocking those loops won’t stand out nearly as much. The left hand edge is the single crochets turn on–you won’t find obvious loops on that side. In the center you’ll see the challenge. A row of crossed triple crochet stitches with a double crochet on each edge of the cloth to close off the row. The optional edging hasn’t been put on this example of the cloth so that you can see these details easily.

Below is the pattern with the inclusion of the challenge row.

 

X-stitch dishcloth

For an approximately 9 in. square dishcloth you will need:

1 1/2 oz cotton yarn

small amount of contrasting color cotton yarn (optional)

H hook (or appropriate hook for both you and your chosen yarn)

Abbreviations used:

Ch–chain

SC—single crochet

DC—double crochet

TR–triple crochet

Loosely chain 28

Row 1: Single crochet in 4th chain from hook. (do not count loop on hook). SC across to end.

Rows 2, 4, 6, and 8: Chain 3. Turn. DC in second stitch and in each stitch across to end.

Rows 3, 5, 7 and 9: Chain 2. Turn. SC in second stitch and in each stitch across to end.

Row 10: Chain 3. Turn. TR in 4th stitch (count the stitch your chain 3 emerges from as the first of these 4) Ch 1, TR in 2nd stitch from beginning (yes, this is going backwards, to form an X you will skip stitches then go back to stitch into them). *Skip next two stitches. TR in next stitch (3rd stitch). Ch 1. TR into the first of the two skipped stitches.* Repeat from * to * until you have a total of 8 Xs across your cloth. This will leave you with one stitch. DC into that last stitch.

Rows: 11, 13, 15, 17, and 19 : Chain 2. Turn. SC in second stitch and in each stitch across to end.

Rows 12, 14, 16, and 18: Chain 3. Turn. DC in second stitch and in each stitch across to end.

At the end of row 19 snip yarn and pull through the last loop. Weave in ends.

Edge with single crochet in contrasting color if desired.

Note: Any of the even numbered rows can be replaced with row 10. This pattern can also be done in other widths as long as they are multiples of 3 +2 bearing in mind that the number of Xs across will change.

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This square was not fun to knit. It took innumerable trips to the frog pond during that first 20 row repeat. Finally, DS, dear soul, pointed out the flaws in the photo of this square in the book. I took a deep breath and said “Okay, screw it, it’ll just _be_ an ugly square.” How very liberating. It didn’t turn out too awful after all. I’m sure once it’s blocked it’ll look quite fine indeed. It seems that this particular stitch pattern behaves a little like ribbing. It looks muddy and undefined until it’s a distance from the needles. Then, suddenly, it behaves itself. Squares like this one and the ribbing squares actually look better in lower light than in bright light. They need the shadows to highlight their textures.

The back of the square has charms all it’s own. I rather like it better than the front. According to DS it looks like Chex cereal. Maybe I’ll use it for my “public” side of this square when the ‘ghan is done.

Earlier this week I had the unique experience of having both DS and DH go along on a visit to the LYS. Usually my LYS visits are solo events–with DS going along on occasion just ’cause he likes petting yarn–so you can imagine how interesting this event was to me. My dear LYS owner, Margaret, was her usual charming self and DH was duly impressed.

The SEX (Stash Enhancement eXperience) was quite nice this trip. Not only did I get the Encore I needed for the LTK ‘ghan, but I signed up for a sock class and got the necessary supplies: some Addi DPNs, a ball of Trekking pro natura in an indigo, blue, purple, and pink colorway, and the Sockology pamphlet. For extra fun I got an Addi Turbo circular (and with DH’s encouragement no less!). It’s already at work in square 7 of the LTK ‘ghan. The Inox Express I’ve been using is a good needle, but the Addi is heavenly.

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